The Land :: www.TheLandOnline.com

Nuts & Bolts

September 17, 2013

True student-athletes no longer exist

Here’s what I found shocking about recent investigative reports from Yahoo! Sports about five SEC players receiving illegal benefits and Sports Illustrated’s exhaustive look at Oklahoma State’s rise to football prominence: Nothing.

Were the pieces troubling? Certainly. Did they expose the unseemly side of college athletes? Surely. Did they point out the corruption we know is present? Definitely.

Admit it: The notion of a true student-athlete is dead. Today’s players, especially those who play major college football and basketball, live in a world of big business, where everyone except those who actually play the game is rewarded handsomely.

Noted historian Taylor Branch said big-time college sports have become an extension of the plantation system. Even Walter Byers, who headed the NCAA for 37 years, had similar views about a system where great amounts of money end up in the hands of a few.

David Zirin, the first sports writer at The Nation magazine, shared this telling nugget with Bill Moyers on Moyers and Company last Friday. He endorsed the idea of college athletes getting paid. “I mean, think about it like this. Woody Hayes, he’s the coach over at Ohio State (from 1951 to 1978). His last year coaching there, he made $43,000 a year. Today the coach at Ohio State, Urban Meyer, makes $4 million a year as a base salary, $4 million a year.”

This is the same Ohio State University where some of the football team’s best athletes were suspended for several games because they sold the gifts they received at a bowl game to pay for tattoos. Players sell merchandise and get penalized, while a coach gets a raise equal to about 100 times the salary of his legendary predecessor, and there’s hardly a peep. Somebody, thanks to the NCAA, got a raw deal in Columbus.

Text Only
Nuts & Bolts
  • Expo takes precautions to prevent spread of virus
    An outbreak of a potentially deadly equine virus will mean some empty stalls at the upcoming Minnesota Horse Expo.

    April 14, 2014

  • CNHI papers honored for spot news, enterprise journalism

    Newspapers in Norman, Okla., Anderson, Ind., and Andover, Mass., are among those honored in the Best of CNHI 2013.

    April 3, 2014 1 Story

  • touch.jpg Divorce is on the rise, and it's the baby boomers' fault

    A new paper from demographers at the University of Minnesota found that the age-standardized divorce rate has actually risen by an astonishing 40 percent since 1980.

    April 3, 2014 1 Photo

  • Newborn.JPG Census: U.S. has fewest births since 1998

    The U.S. recorded the most deaths in its history and the fewest births since 1998, resulting in the lowest population gain from natural causes in 35 years, an analysis of 2013 Census Bureau estimates released Thursday shows.

    April 3, 2014 1 Photo

  • dog-sunglasses.jpg Do animals have a sense of humor?

    Right now, in a high-security research lab at Northwestern University's Falk Center for Molecular Therapeutics, scientists are tickling rats. Their goal? To develop a pharmaceutical-grade happiness pill. But their efforts might also produce some of the best evidence yet that humor isn't something experienced exclusively by human beings.

    April 3, 2014 1 Photo

  • VIDEO: X-Ray released of tree trimmer with chainsaw embedded in neck

    Not only did the tree trimmer who got a chainsaw caught in his neck survive, he climbed down the tree by himself after the accident.

     

     

    April 3, 2014

  • Screen shot 2014-02-20 at 4.23.54 PM.png Get ready for spring with these 3 apps for gardening

    Even if it's still cold out, it's almost time to start planning a spring garden. Whether you have a full backyard garden you eat from all summer or just a few tomatoes and herbs on the porch, these apps will have you make the most of your garden

    February 28, 2014 1 Photo

  • Data breach hits Target's profits, but that's only the tip of the iceberg

    In its first financial release since the December breach that enabled the theft of millions of customers' payment data, Target said profits fell 46 percent and that the breach had already cost the retailer $17 million. The final tally will be bigger, the company said, but it's unclear by how much.

    February 28, 2014

  • Dwindling Midwest high school grads spur college hunt

    A waning number of high school graduates from the Midwest is sparking a college hunt for freshman applicants, with the decline being felt as far away as Harvard and Emory universities.

    February 28, 2014

  • Six reasons childhood obesity has fallen so much

    A major new paper appearing in Wednesday's edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association finds that childhood obesity - age 2 to 5 - has fallen from 13.9 percent in 2003-04 to 8.4 percent in 2011-12.

    February 28, 2014

Featured Ads
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
The Land's Twitter Feed